Media Room

MEDIA RELEASE

default image

THE ISLAND TIMES AUTHOR INTERVIEW

Tom Patton, publisher of The Island Times (www.theislandtimes.com), recently interviewed me about our Detective Clay Randall Thriller Series and the 2015 Florida Book Award for Perception of Power.

 

May 9, 2016

default image

Cop-turned-author finds himself in character

Florida Times-Union Shorelines

March 26, 2016 

By Amanda Williamson (amanda.williamson@jacksonville.com)

Similarities between Bruce Thomason and the main character in his crime thriller series stand out to those who know him — more than 20 years on the police force, a love of bicycle riding — but Thomason says Clay Randall has a mind of his own. Instead, he attributes the shared likeness to a common writer’s tactic: write what you know. Thomason certainly has.

All three of his novels follow Detective Randall, who works on the Jacksonville Beach Police Department, as he solves the challenges placed before him. Already, he has taken down corrupt politicians, rogue former cops, drug rings and serial killers. The fast-paced, action-packed novels reflect Thomason’s eye to detail and research. He spent 45 years in city government, including more than 21 years as the police chief in Jacksonville Beach, and said he garnered ideas from his experience serving on the thin blue line.

“A lot of things that I write are mostly true,” Thomason said. “But I fictionalized them a little bit so that I didn’t just copy headlines.”

While his first two novels took relatively little time, writing on his third, “Perception of Power,” spanned five years. His wife, Jackie, who doubles as his content editor, said she probably read the novel seven times.

“This has been a joint venture from the beginning,” Jackie Thomason said. “That can generate a lot of discussion when we have a difference of opinion.”

But, their efforts paid off.

He won the 2015 Florida Book Award Bronze Medal for popular fiction. This ranks him behind “After the Fall” by Patricia Gussin and “The Pride of Justice” by Marti Green in popular fiction, but among such authors as Cynthia Barnett, whose novel “Mirage” was listed by the Tampa Bay Times as a book every Floridian should read.

“It’s just a great honor to be awarded a medal that includes New York Times bestsellers in the past winners,” Thomason said. “We certainly don’t consider ourselves at that level. Not yet. We hope to get there one day, but just to be included is very exciting.”

Originally from Texas, Thomason spent five years working on the police force in Dayton, Ohio. But, when he began a search for his next job as police chief, he found Jacksonville Beach. He took over command of the police department in 1991 and immediately started to implement programs to improve the area’s quality of life. He helped create the Community Assisted Policing Effort (CAPE) in Pablo Beach, South; Downtown CAPE; the first Citizen Police Academy in northeast Florida; the Citizens on Patrol program; and the Community Response Team. His retirement came on Oct. 9, 2012, exactly 45 years after he started his career in law enforcement as a civilian dispatcher.

It was during those years at Jacksonville Beach Thomason started his writing career. In 2007, he wanted to craft something for his grandchildren’s Christmas gift — something different and more important than just another video game. So, he gave them all super powers and wrote a story in which they had to rescue Santa from his evil second cousin who wanted to keep all the milk and cookies for himself.

The novel whetted Thomason’s writing appetite.

He said other authors have told him there are two styles of writing used to create a novel. The first, he said, involves the author creating an outline and detailing as much about the novel as possible. The other, which Thomason said he uses, is a seat-of-your-pants style. He starts with a general idea of where the novel will begin and where it will end. Then, he sits down at the computer. He compares his writing experience to sitting in the corner of a scene with his computer and recording the action as it unfolds.

“Some scenes lay out differently than anything I had imagined,” Thomason said. “It’s the strangest and most exhilarating thing for me.”

Currently, he is 50 pages into the next Randall adventure.

While writing “Perception of Power,” Thomason took a break to run for and win Seat 4 on the Jacksonville Beach City Council. He still holds the position. He said it hasn’t influenced his writing style or time too much.

Many of Thomason’s ideas come to him while he is out riding his bicycle, a passion his character Randall shares. The beginning of “Perception of Power” shows Randall as he rides his bicycle through a late March rain to a convenience store. Within moments, the friendly chatter between Randall and the cashier is interrupted by a homeless individual — a sight not too uncommon out at the beach.

“My wife says [Clay Randall] is me, but I have to argue it is not,” Thomason said. “But I guess there are parts of him that are.”

April 12, 2016

default image

Two Local Authors Medal in Florida Book Awards

By The Florida Times-Union March 20, 2016
Jacksonville had two winners in the 10th annual Florida Book Awards for works published in 2015: Gracie L. Chandler won a silver medal in the General Fiction category for “Free to Be,” a story of life after slavery on the Sea Islands, and former Jacksonville Beach Police Chief Bruce Thomason won bronze in the Popular Fiction category for “Perception of Power,” book 3 in his series featuring police detective Clay Randall.
Coordinated by the Florida State University Libraries, the Florida Book Awards is the nation’s most comprehensive state book awards program. It was established in 2006 to celebrate the best Florida literature. Authors must be full-time Florida residents, except in the Florida nonfiction and visual arts categories, where the subject matter must focus on Florida.

The Florida Times-Union March 20, 2016

default image

Perception of Power 2015 FBA Bronze Medalist

Perception of Power, the third book in the Clay Randall Thriller Series, has been awarded the Bronze Medal in the Popular Fiction category by the Florida Book Awards.

More than 200 hundred eligible publications were submitted across the nine categories of competition.

Coordinated by the Florida State University Libraries, the Florida Book Awards is the nation’s most comprehensive state book awards program. It was established in 2006 to celebrate the best Florida literature. Authors must be full-time Florida residents, except in the Florida nonfiction and visual arts categories, where the subject matter must focus on Florida.

Read Media Release

March 11, 2016

default image

Former JB Police Chief’s New Crime Thriller

Bruce Thomason, retired Jacksonville Beach Police Chief and current city councilor, recently published his third crime thriller, Perception of Power. The setting for all three novels is Jacksonville Beach and features.. (click link below to read more)

The Beaches Leader – 12/31/15

January 2, 2016

IN THE NEWS

default image

THE ISLAND TIMES AUTHOR INTERVIEW

Tom Patton, publisher of The Island Times (www.theislandtimes.com), recently interviewed me about our Detective Clay Randall Thriller Series and the 2015 Florida Book Award for Perception of Power.

 

May 9, 2016

default image

Cop-turned-author finds himself in character

Florida Times-Union Shorelines

March 26, 2016 

By Amanda Williamson (amanda.williamson@jacksonville.com)

Similarities between Bruce Thomason and the main character in his crime thriller series stand out to those who know him — more than 20 years on the police force, a love of bicycle riding — but Thomason says Clay Randall has a mind of his own. Instead, he attributes the shared likeness to a common writer’s tactic: write what you know. Thomason certainly has.

All three of his novels follow Detective Randall, who works on the Jacksonville Beach Police Department, as he solves the challenges placed before him. Already, he has taken down corrupt politicians, rogue former cops, drug rings and serial killers. The fast-paced, action-packed novels reflect Thomason’s eye to detail and research. He spent 45 years in city government, including more than 21 years as the police chief in Jacksonville Beach, and said he garnered ideas from his experience serving on the thin blue line.

“A lot of things that I write are mostly true,” Thomason said. “But I fictionalized them a little bit so that I didn’t just copy headlines.”

While his first two novels took relatively little time, writing on his third, “Perception of Power,” spanned five years. His wife, Jackie, who doubles as his content editor, said she probably read the novel seven times.

“This has been a joint venture from the beginning,” Jackie Thomason said. “That can generate a lot of discussion when we have a difference of opinion.”

But, their efforts paid off.

He won the 2015 Florida Book Award Bronze Medal for popular fiction. This ranks him behind “After the Fall” by Patricia Gussin and “The Pride of Justice” by Marti Green in popular fiction, but among such authors as Cynthia Barnett, whose novel “Mirage” was listed by the Tampa Bay Times as a book every Floridian should read.

“It’s just a great honor to be awarded a medal that includes New York Times bestsellers in the past winners,” Thomason said. “We certainly don’t consider ourselves at that level. Not yet. We hope to get there one day, but just to be included is very exciting.”

Originally from Texas, Thomason spent five years working on the police force in Dayton, Ohio. But, when he began a search for his next job as police chief, he found Jacksonville Beach. He took over command of the police department in 1991 and immediately started to implement programs to improve the area’s quality of life. He helped create the Community Assisted Policing Effort (CAPE) in Pablo Beach, South; Downtown CAPE; the first Citizen Police Academy in northeast Florida; the Citizens on Patrol program; and the Community Response Team. His retirement came on Oct. 9, 2012, exactly 45 years after he started his career in law enforcement as a civilian dispatcher.

It was during those years at Jacksonville Beach Thomason started his writing career. In 2007, he wanted to craft something for his grandchildren’s Christmas gift — something different and more important than just another video game. So, he gave them all super powers and wrote a story in which they had to rescue Santa from his evil second cousin who wanted to keep all the milk and cookies for himself.

The novel whetted Thomason’s writing appetite.

He said other authors have told him there are two styles of writing used to create a novel. The first, he said, involves the author creating an outline and detailing as much about the novel as possible. The other, which Thomason said he uses, is a seat-of-your-pants style. He starts with a general idea of where the novel will begin and where it will end. Then, he sits down at the computer. He compares his writing experience to sitting in the corner of a scene with his computer and recording the action as it unfolds.

“Some scenes lay out differently than anything I had imagined,” Thomason said. “It’s the strangest and most exhilarating thing for me.”

Currently, he is 50 pages into the next Randall adventure.

While writing “Perception of Power,” Thomason took a break to run for and win Seat 4 on the Jacksonville Beach City Council. He still holds the position. He said it hasn’t influenced his writing style or time too much.

Many of Thomason’s ideas come to him while he is out riding his bicycle, a passion his character Randall shares. The beginning of “Perception of Power” shows Randall as he rides his bicycle through a late March rain to a convenience store. Within moments, the friendly chatter between Randall and the cashier is interrupted by a homeless individual — a sight not too uncommon out at the beach.

“My wife says [Clay Randall] is me, but I have to argue it is not,” Thomason said. “But I guess there are parts of him that are.”

April 12, 2016

default image

Book Review: Former Jax Beach Police Chief returns with thrilling “Perception of Power”

By C. F. Foster

For the Florida Times-Union

April 10, 2016

“Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority; still more when you superadd the tendency of the certainty of corruption by authority.” Lord John Acton (1834-1902)

Our favorite Jacksonville Beach policeman understands the enduring verity expressed in this quote by this 19th century defender of religious and political freedom.

In “Perception of Power,” his third adventure written by former Jacksonville Beach Police Chief Bruce Thomason, detective Clay Randall stumbles into the gun sights of the most politically powerful man in town. Randall has been fighting crime in Jacksonville Beach for nearly 20 years. Currently a commander, he is well-respected and liked by most of his peers, but his no-nonsense, get-to-the-point style has made him enemies. Now, after an accident, he becomes an enemy of a United States senator.

As with Thomason’s other books, “Perception” (although it ends with a bang) is written as a straightforward police procedural. This is modern police work at its best as the Beach gang travels across the country gathering DNA to uncover a professional assassin.

Thomason’s clear hand keeps the plot from getting bogged down as his characters slog through the details surrounding this complicated scene-stealing criminal. As the chase ramps up, their case comes to an explosive climax.

With more than 45 years in small town law enforcement, Chief Thomason knows his stuff.

In 1967, he joined his hometown police department in Beaumont, Texas, rising through the ranks to captain. In 1986, he was named chief of police in West Carrollton, Ohio, and in 1991, accepted the chief’s position with Jacksonville Beach. He retired in Oct. 2012.

On his well-designed website, Thomason states his philosophy, which just happens to be Clay Randall’s as well: “Saving lives, catching bad guys, working with citizens to protect the community; that’s what law enforcement is all about.”

C. F. Foster lives in Riverside.

April 12, 2016

Florida Times-Union Shorelines

image

Check out the nice article by Amanda Williamson about the Detective Clay Randall thriller series.

March 26, 2016

default image

Five-Star Review for The Six O’clock Rule

The Six O’Clock Rule: “If you’re thinking of doing something that might make you look like a dumbass on the six o’clock news, here’s a tip. Don’t.” 

The setting is Jacksonville Beach, Florida. The Six O’Clock Rule begins with an action packed shoot out. I was hooked from the first page. I eagerly turned the pages to see what would happen next. The plot is exquisitely well developed and believable. Bruce Thomason is a master at character development. He has included enough twists and turns to keep the reader guessing to the last page. Fans will be thrilled with the latest Clay Randall mystery.

Anne Boling www.readersfavorite.com November 8, 2015

default image

Gold Medal for The Six O’clock Rule

Jacksonville Beach, FL – THE SIX O’CLOCK RULE, the second novel by Jacksonville Beach Police Chief Bruce Thomason, has won a Gold Medal in the 2011 Readers Favorite National Book Awards Competition in the FICTION-THRILLER genre. The novel was also recognized as a FINALIST in the FICTION-SUSPENSE category. In addition, The Six O’clock Rule received a FIVE-STAR Review by Readers Favorite, the highest rating given.

November 8, 2015

default image

Five Star Review for Perception of Power

In Perception of Power by Bruce Thomason, Denise Adams, a small town mayor, is in love with a senator busy with his election prospects. Advised by his team that the present lady love is not a good fit for a presidential campaign, the senator is on the lookout for an escape from this relationship. And Clay, a commander of standing in the police department, happens to come on the wrong side of the senator while carrying out his duties. With powerful people attempting to derail their investigation at various points, the intrepid commander Clay Randall and his team of detectives chase a dangerous criminal across the country.

This is more than three hundred pages of nonstop thrills. The conspiracies leading to the crime, as well as the resulting investigation, are planned meticulously. This book is a page turner with an excellent narrative. The suspenseful nature of the drama is taken to its pinnacle with competence and efficiency by the backdrop of characters. With a flurry of side plots to add interesting twists and turns, this book is capable of engaging a reader completely. And the characters are well crafted; I sympathized with all of them, including the villains.

Roy T. James www.readersfavorite.com November 2, 2015

default image

Finalist – Indie Excellence Book Award

Author Bruce Thomason’s action packed cop thriller, The Six O’clock Rule, recently received national recognition as a FINALIST in the 2011 National Indie Excellence Book Awards. The Six O’clock Rule is Thomason’s second novel in the ongoing Clay Randall police detective series. He is currently hard at work on book three in the series.

Read More

October 21, 2015

PRAISE

default image

THE ISLAND TIMES AUTHOR INTERVIEW

Tom Patton, publisher of The Island Times (www.theislandtimes.com), recently interviewed me about our Detective Clay Randall Thriller Series and the 2015 Florida Book Award for Perception of Power.

 

May 9, 2016

default image

Cop-turned-author finds himself in character

Florida Times-Union Shorelines

March 26, 2016 

By Amanda Williamson (amanda.williamson@jacksonville.com)

Similarities between Bruce Thomason and the main character in his crime thriller series stand out to those who know him — more than 20 years on the police force, a love of bicycle riding — but Thomason says Clay Randall has a mind of his own. Instead, he attributes the shared likeness to a common writer’s tactic: write what you know. Thomason certainly has.

All three of his novels follow Detective Randall, who works on the Jacksonville Beach Police Department, as he solves the challenges placed before him. Already, he has taken down corrupt politicians, rogue former cops, drug rings and serial killers. The fast-paced, action-packed novels reflect Thomason’s eye to detail and research. He spent 45 years in city government, including more than 21 years as the police chief in Jacksonville Beach, and said he garnered ideas from his experience serving on the thin blue line.

“A lot of things that I write are mostly true,” Thomason said. “But I fictionalized them a little bit so that I didn’t just copy headlines.”

While his first two novels took relatively little time, writing on his third, “Perception of Power,” spanned five years. His wife, Jackie, who doubles as his content editor, said she probably read the novel seven times.

“This has been a joint venture from the beginning,” Jackie Thomason said. “That can generate a lot of discussion when we have a difference of opinion.”

But, their efforts paid off.

He won the 2015 Florida Book Award Bronze Medal for popular fiction. This ranks him behind “After the Fall” by Patricia Gussin and “The Pride of Justice” by Marti Green in popular fiction, but among such authors as Cynthia Barnett, whose novel “Mirage” was listed by the Tampa Bay Times as a book every Floridian should read.

“It’s just a great honor to be awarded a medal that includes New York Times bestsellers in the past winners,” Thomason said. “We certainly don’t consider ourselves at that level. Not yet. We hope to get there one day, but just to be included is very exciting.”

Originally from Texas, Thomason spent five years working on the police force in Dayton, Ohio. But, when he began a search for his next job as police chief, he found Jacksonville Beach. He took over command of the police department in 1991 and immediately started to implement programs to improve the area’s quality of life. He helped create the Community Assisted Policing Effort (CAPE) in Pablo Beach, South; Downtown CAPE; the first Citizen Police Academy in northeast Florida; the Citizens on Patrol program; and the Community Response Team. His retirement came on Oct. 9, 2012, exactly 45 years after he started his career in law enforcement as a civilian dispatcher.

It was during those years at Jacksonville Beach Thomason started his writing career. In 2007, he wanted to craft something for his grandchildren’s Christmas gift — something different and more important than just another video game. So, he gave them all super powers and wrote a story in which they had to rescue Santa from his evil second cousin who wanted to keep all the milk and cookies for himself.

The novel whetted Thomason’s writing appetite.

He said other authors have told him there are two styles of writing used to create a novel. The first, he said, involves the author creating an outline and detailing as much about the novel as possible. The other, which Thomason said he uses, is a seat-of-your-pants style. He starts with a general idea of where the novel will begin and where it will end. Then, he sits down at the computer. He compares his writing experience to sitting in the corner of a scene with his computer and recording the action as it unfolds.

“Some scenes lay out differently than anything I had imagined,” Thomason said. “It’s the strangest and most exhilarating thing for me.”

Currently, he is 50 pages into the next Randall adventure.

While writing “Perception of Power,” Thomason took a break to run for and win Seat 4 on the Jacksonville Beach City Council. He still holds the position. He said it hasn’t influenced his writing style or time too much.

Many of Thomason’s ideas come to him while he is out riding his bicycle, a passion his character Randall shares. The beginning of “Perception of Power” shows Randall as he rides his bicycle through a late March rain to a convenience store. Within moments, the friendly chatter between Randall and the cashier is interrupted by a homeless individual — a sight not too uncommon out at the beach.

“My wife says [Clay Randall] is me, but I have to argue it is not,” Thomason said. “But I guess there are parts of him that are.”

April 12, 2016

default image

Book Review: Former Jax Beach Police Chief returns with thrilling “Perception of Power”

By C. F. Foster

For the Florida Times-Union

April 10, 2016

“Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority; still more when you superadd the tendency of the certainty of corruption by authority.” Lord John Acton (1834-1902)

Our favorite Jacksonville Beach policeman understands the enduring verity expressed in this quote by this 19th century defender of religious and political freedom.

In “Perception of Power,” his third adventure written by former Jacksonville Beach Police Chief Bruce Thomason, detective Clay Randall stumbles into the gun sights of the most politically powerful man in town. Randall has been fighting crime in Jacksonville Beach for nearly 20 years. Currently a commander, he is well-respected and liked by most of his peers, but his no-nonsense, get-to-the-point style has made him enemies. Now, after an accident, he becomes an enemy of a United States senator.

As with Thomason’s other books, “Perception” (although it ends with a bang) is written as a straightforward police procedural. This is modern police work at its best as the Beach gang travels across the country gathering DNA to uncover a professional assassin.

Thomason’s clear hand keeps the plot from getting bogged down as his characters slog through the details surrounding this complicated scene-stealing criminal. As the chase ramps up, their case comes to an explosive climax.

With more than 45 years in small town law enforcement, Chief Thomason knows his stuff.

In 1967, he joined his hometown police department in Beaumont, Texas, rising through the ranks to captain. In 1986, he was named chief of police in West Carrollton, Ohio, and in 1991, accepted the chief’s position with Jacksonville Beach. He retired in Oct. 2012.

On his well-designed website, Thomason states his philosophy, which just happens to be Clay Randall’s as well: “Saving lives, catching bad guys, working with citizens to protect the community; that’s what law enforcement is all about.”

C. F. Foster lives in Riverside.

April 12, 2016

default image

LOVED THEM!

Bruce

My wife and I have read all three of your  Clay Randall books. LOVED THEM.

HOPE YOU WILL BE COMING OUT WITH ANOTHER SOON. Either Clay or some new character.

Hank Ashbaugh April 12, 2016

Florida Times-Union Shorelines

image

Check out the nice article by Amanda Williamson about the Detective Clay Randall thriller series.

March 26, 2016

default image

Praise from U. S. Senator Bill Nelson, Florida

SenBillNelsonLetter

March 20, 2016

default image

Two Local Authors Medal in Florida Book Awards

By The Florida Times-Union March 20, 2016
Jacksonville had two winners in the 10th annual Florida Book Awards for works published in 2015: Gracie L. Chandler won a silver medal in the General Fiction category for “Free to Be,” a story of life after slavery on the Sea Islands, and former Jacksonville Beach Police Chief Bruce Thomason won bronze in the Popular Fiction category for “Perception of Power,” book 3 in his series featuring police detective Clay Randall.
Coordinated by the Florida State University Libraries, the Florida Book Awards is the nation’s most comprehensive state book awards program. It was established in 2006 to celebrate the best Florida literature. Authors must be full-time Florida residents, except in the Florida nonfiction and visual arts categories, where the subject matter must focus on Florida.

The Florida Times-Union March 20, 2016

default image

Keep ’em Coming!!

Chief, you really outdid yourself with Perception of Power. I am a fairly voracious reader, especially adventure, crime, and mystery books, and I can honestly say this book is up there with the best I have read! Keep ’em coming!!

William Daniel January 3, 2016

default image

Perception of Power: Can hardly put it down!

Just have to put a plug in for a great writer and friend, one of South Park’s finest !!! “Perception of Power” is his latest book, and you couldn’t purchase a better gift for yourself or a friend !
I’ve just started reading it, and can hardly put it down !

Bill Dunshie December 23, 2015

default image

Opens Fast and Never Slows

It is a pleasure to follow the progression of the Clay Randall series. Really enjoy how the characters have developed and this latest book has plot twists and turns that make it hard to put down. Perception of Power opens fast and never slows.

islanddawg74 November 21, 2015

default image

Best Yet!

PerceptionofPower best yet! Really enjoyed the story and characters – Can’t wait for the next one!

@islanddawg74 November 20, 2015

default image

Keep You Enthralled

Perception of Power by Bruce Thomason. Great book. It  will keep you enthralled from the first page.  I couldn’t put it down. Can’t wait to read Clay’s next adventure.

Vicki De Latte Johnson November 13, 2015

default image

Intriguing and Thought Provoking

From the next installment of author Bruce Thomason’s Detective Randall series, Perception of Power is the most intriguing and thought provoking thus far.  Having personal experience working in law enforcement elicits an extremely critical view of crime fiction; however, Perception of Power adheres to correct and current law enforcement terminology, strategy, and responses.  Detective Clay Randall continues on his journey investigating a crime interlaced with politics and personal history while pursuing a suspect whose actions ultimately surprise and engage the reader.  Author, Thomason, showcases the perils of unethical personnel and corrupt elected government officials interfering with the operations and management of local law enforcement agencies.  Perception of Power’s idyllic primary setting of Jacksonville Beach adds to the backdrop, especially to those in love with coastal communities.  Perception of Power holds the reader’s attention throughout and keeps the pages turning well into the night!

Jen Zdunkiewicz

November 8, 2015

default image

The Book is Terrific

Just finished reading a great book, “Perception of Power” by Bruce Thomason. The book is terrific. Great plot, real characters, didn’t want to stop reading. Another awesome job! I can’t wait for the next one.

Randy Greene November 8, 2015

default image

Excellent Read!

Perception of Power was fast moving, enjoyed all the twists and turns.

Darla Buck

November 8, 2015

default image

Perception of Power Is Great!

First off, let me say that I’m 90 years old and love to read. I read Bruce Thomason’s other two books and enjoyed the characters so much so when Perception of Power came out, I immediately got a copy and started reading. Last night, at 8:30, I sat down to read a couple more chapters before bed. But I couldn’t stop. The story was moving so fast that I kept reading until one o’clock in the morning. This is Bruce’s best book yet!! I hope he keeps writing!

W. Fread

 

November 2, 2015

Jacksonville Beach Police Chief Writes Award-Winning Mystery Thrillers

As Jacksonville Beach’s chief of police, Bruce Thomason exercises a lot of authority, but as an author, it’s his characters who control him. “I’m sitting off in a corner, on my laptop, and the dialogue and the action’s taking place in front of me and I’m simply recording what I’m seeing and hearing,” he said.

Read More

Max Jaeger, Beaches Leader October 21, 2015

default image

Finalist – Indie Excellence Book Award

Author Bruce Thomason’s action packed cop thriller, The Six O’clock Rule, recently received national recognition as a FINALIST in the 2011 National Indie Excellence Book Awards. The Six O’clock Rule is Thomason’s second novel in the ongoing Clay Randall police detective series. He is currently hard at work on book three in the series.

Read More

October 21, 2015

default image

Police chief chases crooks on paper, too

Bruce Thomason’s first novel unfolds at Jacksonville Beach.
On April 1, 1967, Bruce Thomason, a college student, went to work as a dispatcher for the police department in his hometown of Beaumont, Texas. At the end of his shift, he went home with a massive headache but a desire to make law enforcement his career. Today, after 41 years as a cop, the last 17 as chief of police in Jacksonville Beach, the 62-year-old has found a new pursuit he loves as much as police work. Thomason’s first novel, Body Toll, is the story of a police hunt for a serial killer in Jacksonville Beach and was published early last month.

Read More

Charlie Patton, Florida Times Union October 21, 2015

default image

Jacksonville Beach Police Chief Pens Crime Novel

Bruce Thomason draws on his more than 40 years as a lawman in his debut crime novel, “Body Toll,” released recently by High-Pitched Hum Publishing. A remorseless serial killer is roaming the Sunshine State carving up homeless people and prostitutes to meet “his twisted justification for purging the weak from the human herd,” and Det. Sgt. Clay Randall has caught the redball case. Randall and his homicide team are in a rush to catch the knife-welding killer after bodies start dropping in Jacksonville Beach.

JOHNNY WOODHOUSE, The Beaches Leader October 21, 2015

default image

Suspenseful!

The Six O’Clock Rule is suspenseful and keeps you wanting more. It keeps you on the edge and has lots of twists that you don’t expect. I am ready for the 3rd book.

Brianna Walsh October 21, 2015

default image

Exciting, Interesting, Suspenseful, Intriguing

My daughter Jo Anne gave me a gift copy of your novel (Body Toll) that you signed for me. I can’t help but wonder why you have not hit the bestseller’s list with this one. Exciting, interesting, suspenseful, intriguing, it kept my attention throughout. Not a slow yawner paragraph in it. Your technique is right on. Good luck and write another. I’m waiting for it.

Mike Bustamante October 21, 2015

default image

Thank You for a Great Book

I picked up your book (Body Toll) ’cause I thought it looked like the pier at Jacksonville Beach. You said it was and then told me what your book was about. I bought it. I am so glad I did. I liked the characters, the story line and have been in most of the places you described. You made it feel as though the reader (me, a Jacksonville native) was there. Thank you for a great book and I look forward to the next one. Keep up the good work!

Rudi Holloway October 21, 2015

default image

I Really Liked the Book!

Thank you for autographing my book back in December. It is very much treasured. So far, the book has been not only in Florida, but also, Indiana, North Carolina, Maryland, Washington, DC. We have recommended it to many of our friends who I hope have purchased a copy. For a personal review, I have read many cop novels in my time, but none, and I mean NONE, have the riveting and very descriptive story line of Body Toll. I found it to be immensely pleasing with the short chapters and the point to point events. From the beach to the backwoods, you make the reader feel as if he or she is actually right there in the middle of the action with Wilson, Randall, Cooper and others. Your description of the homeless is nothing less than superb as you describe the very real ‘assumed’ conditions which the homeless live under. (I think unless you have really been there, it is hard to get the feel.) I could go on and on, but I know you get the gist of this–I really liked the book. This would make a good case for a thriller movie.

Bob Helms, PhD October 21, 2015

default image

Eagerly Awaiting the Sequel

Finished Body Toll today – couldn’t keep away from it. Liked the tension at various points – sort of a “hold your breath” moment. And it had several good twists . . . those “oh……” moments. Eagerly awaiting the sequel. Thanks for a good read.

Sue Quinlan October 21, 2015

Subscribe

Get periodic news about the authors, their novels, and BATJAK Publishing delivered to your inbox.

Cart